rum tagged posts

Samanya: A Tribute to Bartendering

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In 1948 when David A. Embury was publishing the book “The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks” little he knew it will become a classic cocktail book, praised 70 years later. The book attempted to put an order to the mess of the cocktails and all the different mixed drinks that right after the end of the second World War became a growing trend. He laid down a few simple rules and concepts that can be a guide, a compass for every bartender. The peak era of the cocktails was in the 60s. The Rat Pack and James Bond made cocktails cool. And then came the 70’s. The Dance floor was steamy hot. The dancers need to cool down and get energy. Slowly the Martini and the Manhatan gave their place to neon colored sissified drinks.The 90s came along and Jazz, Blues and the Funk all became popular again. And just like a whole new generation was rediscovering the music, the cocktails became popular again. The bartenders gave up the colorful drinks for tasteful drinks. The globalization brought in the scene new high proof alcohols and more exquisite flavors. Suddenly David A. Embury’s book was rediscovered. The old copies skyrocketed to hundreds of dollars. It went back in press. David did not dictate, he suggested. He suggested 5 simple rules.

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Mojito: When to Legend Drinks Met Up

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Recently there has been a big focus on this blog on cocktails. The cocktails are not just a mixed drink to have fun, it is cooking since the mixing is a form of art, as was stated in the book the “Fine art of Mixing Drinks” published in the 1900s and still in print today. Although the book describes 6 basic cocktails there are some other classic cocktails that are not only worth mentioning, but it is important to learn the right method of making them. I am not a bartender or very experienced with drinks. There are some drinks however that I have master and I do hope that you will too. I am here to help. The cocktail today is the Mojito.
This summer ...

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The Condiments: Mustard (Rum drunk mustard)

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After a busy month, and a big absence I am back with more recipes. As you probably guessed by the tittle, I am going to speak for the condiments, those creamy things that are on every fast food table and on every refrigerator. The trinity of those condiments are the mustard, the ketchup, and the mayonnaise. All those condiments, are very easy to make, but for some reason we have been taught that they only come in jar. Well they don ‘t!!! They are easy to make and they are so flavorful, that once you try them, you will never go back to the store bought again. Well you might go, but you will not like it. 

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Mixology 101: Sidecar

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The Sidecar is a classic cocktail traditionally made with Cognac, Cointreau, and lemon juice. It is one of six basic drinks listed in David A. Embury’s classic (The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks). The exact origin of the Sidecar is unclear, but it was created around the end of World War I in either London or Paris. It is a variation on the older Brandy Daisy (brandy, yellow Chartreuse, and lemon juice). The first recipes for the Sidecar appear in 1922, in both Harry MacElhone’s Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails and Robert Vermeire’s Cocktails and How to Mix Them. In early editions of MacElhone’s book, he cites the inventor as Pat MacGarry, “the Popular bar-tender at Buck’s Club, London”, but in later editions he cites himself. Vermiere states, “This cocktail is very popular in France. It was first introduced in London by MacGarry, the celebrated bar-tender of Buck’s Club.” David A. Embury (The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks, 1948) credits the invention of the drink to an American Army captain in Paris during World War I “and named after the motorcycle sidecar in which the good captain was driven to and from the little bistro where the drink was born and christened”.

Both MacElhone and Vermiere state the recipe as equal parts Cognac, Cointreau...

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Mixology 101: Daiquiri

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The name Daiquirí is also the name of a beach near Santiago, Cuba, and an iron mine in that area. The cocktail was invented about 1905 in a bar named Venus in Santiago, about 23 miles east of the mine, by a group of American mining engineers. Among the engineers present were Jennings Cox, General Manager of the Spanish American Iron Co., J. Francis Linthicum, C. Manning Combs, George W. Pfeiffer, De Berneire Whitaker, C. Merritt Holmes and Proctor O. Persing. Although stories persist that that Cox invented the drink when he ran out of gin while entertaining American guests, the drink evolved naturally due to the prevalence of lime and sugar.

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